Team

Ying
Staton

Director
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Ying Staton

Ying runs Global Counsel’s Asia team from its office in Singapore. Ying has a background in public policy, development and international relations. She has advised senior UK politicians including the Prime Minister, having started her career in the British government where she worked in 10 Downing Street and held a number of roles in the UK Department for International Development in London and Africa.

At Global Counsel, Ying leads client work in Asia. Her work revolves around supporting Asian clients investing and trading overseas, and advising European and American clients on political economy issues and stakeholder engagement in Asia. She has focused on issues around trade, market entry, reputational risk and sustainability, and has worked on client projects in countries including China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Maldives, Nigeria and Gabon.

Latest Insights by Ying Staton

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Foreign Investment: Rising Tides of Politics in Regulation

Financial Services

Recent years have seen important global shifts in both the policy frameworks for screening inward foreign investment and the way in which they are applied. These shifts come against a backdrop of protectionist political rhetoric and anxieties about the impact of foreign direct investment (FDI) in traditionally open economies. The new landscape is exemplified by the…

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General Politics

Will Britain lose Dyson to Singapore?

General Politics

Last week Dyson announced the opening of a new £330 million R&D centre in Singapore. The focus of the centre, home to Dyson’s new Global Technology Centre of Excellence, is on commercialising Dyson’s technology for global markets, including, for example, for use in smart homes. Dyson has grand ambitions to expand beyond household devices into technologies that will…

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Financial services icon

Tackling “fake” FDI: why China is clamping down on foreign acquisitions

Financial Services

At the end of November, the Chinese government indicated that it intended to exert greater scrutiny over Chinese outbound investment. Draft policy papers released online outlined a new policy whereby government approval would be required for foreign acquisitions valued over US$10 billion, or US$1 billion if the target was considered to be outside of the acquirer’s core…

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